When your future is in the hands of Engel Law Group, you can rest assured that we have your best interests at heart. Our Dallas, Texas, practice handles family law, bankruptcy and estate planning cases. These topics cover some of the most important areas in your life as well as in the legal world. We take our job as your counsel seriously as we establish plans to preserve your rights,...

What is Domestic Adoption? - ArticlesAdopting a Child: What it Means, How it Works and Why You ShouldHow U.S. Adoption WorksWhat is Private Adoption? Adopt a Baby with American Adoptions Do You Want to Adopt a Newborn Baby?How to Adopt a Child - The Domestic Adoption ProcessWhy Adopt? 23 Reasons to Adopt a ChildDomestic vs. International AdoptionOur Domestic Adoption ProgramsMinimizing Adoption Wait TimesMore . . .


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What is Domestic Adoption? - ArticlesAdopting a Child: What it Means, How it Works and Why You ShouldHow U.S. Adoption WorksWhat is Private Adoption? Adopt a Baby with American Adoptions Do You Want to Adopt a Newborn Baby?How to Adopt a Child - The Domestic Adoption ProcessWhy Adopt? 23 Reasons to Adopt a ChildDomestic vs. International AdoptionOur Domestic Adoption ProgramsMinimizing Adoption Wait TimesMore . . .
Many law schools require that applicants possess a bachelor's degree. Although no specific undergraduate field of study is required to attend law school, courses in economics, English, public speaking, government, and history can be helpful preparation. Aspiring adoption attorneys may consider completing coursework in child and family studies in order to gain insight into family dynamics and child development.
Whether you are a foster parent, a stepparent, a prospective parent of an adult or a parent of a child who came into your life through overseas adoption, we have the skills and readiness to help you move forward with confidence. It will be our privilege to guide your family through the process of adoption or advise you on a related legal matter. An initial consultation with a Texas lawyer is the first step to moving from foster care to adoption or resolving any adoption-related family law matter. Email us or call 817-789-4555 for a prompt response.
Thanks to the efforts of all of you who have worked so hard over the past two months, children and families won a great victory. The final tax reform bill and conference report was unveiled on December 15 and we are pleased to share that both the adoption tax credit and the tax benefit for employer provided adoption benefits have been SAVED! Read the final version of the tax reform bill here. 
When my wife and I adopted our son, we were told that we needed to hire multiple attorneys. One to represent the birth mother. One to represent the child. One to represent the birth father. And one to represent us. When we adopted our daughter we needed even more. One for the child. One for the birth mother. One for us. And one for each of the three possible birth fathers! We were outnumbered! Since no agency was involved, the attorney fees, the home study and the court costs were our only expenses. And when it came time to file our income taxes we claimed the adoption tax credit and were reimbursed the entire amount. Both times.  We were fortunate. Adoptions can be, and in most cases are much more expensive.

We pride ourselves on staying in close communication with our clients and treating them like family. Our firm will take the time to listen to your concerns, alleviate your fears and explain the legal process to you, whether it is a home study, a court hearing, mediation session or, in rare cases, a trial. We provide honest case assessments. We pledge to handle your matter with competence and integrity if you choose to work with Hughes Law Center.
I share your commitment, having been raised in a family that included both adopted and foster children. I also know that becoming a foster or adoptive parent is a complex and sometimes arduous process. Legal issues may arise at any time which affect you and the best interests of children in your care. I am here to assist you through these processes. Contact me today to discuss your situation.
The Academy of Adoption and Assisted Reproduction Attorneys (AAAA) provides a credentialed presence in the law of family formation and is the largest professional organization of its type. AAAA and its attorneys are dedicated to the competent and ethical practice of adoption and ART law, advocating for laws and policies to protect the best interests of children, the legal status of families formed through adoption and ART, and the rights of all interested parties including birth parents, adoptive parents, surrogates, donors, and intended parents.
In case of an open adoption, the identifying information of birth parents and adoptive parents are exchanged and there will be interaction between natural parents and the adopted person. However, this is subject to termination by the adoptive parent. Often natural parents and adoptive parents will enter into an agreement pertaining to rights concerning visitation, custody of child and other parental rights. Closed adoption, on the other hand, involves no exchange of personal information. In a closed adoption, the adoptive parent will be unaware of the family history of the adoptee.
You mentioned PA... so Im guessing thats where you are (Im in PA as well). We are adopting a child from foster care and recently went to the lawyer's office. The first step the lawyer told us about the process was to file an "intent to adopt" letter with the court. It was a formal letter that had detailed information about the child, us, bios, etc. Additionally, attached to the letter of intent had to be a copy of our child abuse clearances and a homestudy. Based on how the lawyer walked us through the paperwork, the clearances and homestudy was a must (not just b/c of foster care). He did explain all the law references to us that were in the letter, but I don't have a copy of the intent letter yet that he was filing. (It was a rough draft that we were going over). I really think you will need a lawyer. If you still want to try to do it without one, call the local court and find out what papers you need to submit to request an adoption.

Thanks to the efforts of all of you who have worked so hard over the past two months, children and families won a great victory. The final tax reform bill and conference report was unveiled on December 15 and we are pleased to share that both the adoption tax credit and the tax benefit for employer provided adoption benefits have been SAVED! Read the final version of the tax reform bill here. 
Megan Cohen is an adoption and assisted reproductive technology attorney. She is the owner of Family Formation Law Offices in Lafayette, California representing birth parents, adopting parents, intended parents, surrogates, and gamete donors. She serves on the board of the birthmother-focused On Your Feet Foundation of Northern California. She is also a birth mother. Vist her website www.helpwithadoption.com.
Can’t you just rely on the adoption agency to get things right? No, you can’t assume that an adoption agency won’t make mistakes. Every year scores of innocent prospective adoptive parents find themselves facing felony charges for adoption fraud. The website LegalMatch.com has written an exceptional article that discusses the matter of wrongful adoption.1
Seems like adoptive parents can really be in charge of making themselves available to a child that is truly in need of an adoptive family – not situations where the jury is still out as it were. I think domestic adoptions you could be much more confident that poverty was not a reason for giving up their child for adoption as well because this country does have a comprehensive welfare program for families below the poverty line specifically so they don’t have to loose their children to adoption. In other countries the reason for giving a child up for adoption might well be abject poverty and many of the adopted people I’ve helped from other countries, love their American adoptive parents but will say behind their backs that the money it cost to adopt them could have been given to their parents so that they could remain with their families. That seems like it just would not be an issue adopting a child domestically.

Once all of these steps and reports are complete the court will evaluate all of the information provided in an effort to determine what is best for the child. The judge will make this decision after hearing the testimony of involved parties, examining the required reports and studies and then applying the law that applies to your particular situation.

In case of an open adoption, the identifying information of birth parents and adoptive parents are exchanged and there will be interaction between natural parents and the adopted person. However, this is subject to termination by the adoptive parent. Often natural parents and adoptive parents will enter into an agreement pertaining to rights concerning visitation, custody of child and other parental rights. Closed adoption, on the other hand, involves no exchange of personal information. In a closed adoption, the adoptive parent will be unaware of the family history of the adoptee.
Each step you complete prior beginning the adoption process prepares you and your family to bring a new child into your home — and helps ensure a seamless integration with your family. These steps are basically the same for families who wish to open their homes to children in need of foster care. Your Dallas family law attorney at GoransonBain Ausley can help guide you through the adoption process.
There are three types of non-agency adoptions: adult adoptions, stepparent adoptions and parental placement adoptions. Adult adoptions typically do not result in the conflict and controversy that can be created in the latter two types of adoptions. The rights of the biological parents are implicated in both stepparent adoptions and parental placement adoptions. If these types are done with the consent of the biological parents then their parental rights must be terminated before the child can be placed with the adoptive family. Further, in almost all parental placement adoptions, an investigation must be completed as regards the child’s biological parents, the prospective adoptive parent(s) and the home situation of the child. There may be hearings as well to determine the best interests of the child in both stepparent and parental placement adoptions. There can even be a full trial where there are disputes over parental rights, the best interest of the child and/or the qualifications of the adoptive parents. Above all else in an adoption, the entire process is governed by a quest for determining the best interests of the child.

The Thomson Reuters Legal Executive Institute is pleased to present the 18th Annual Law Firm COO & CFO Forum this October in New York City. The premier national summit for eponymous title holders and their peers, the Law Firm COO & CFO Forum continues its tradition of comprehensive professional education and networking opportunities for the Am Law 200 and beyond. The 2019… Read more »


The Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children (ICPC) applies in any adoption when a baby is going to cross state lines. How long an adoptive family stays in the state of birth after the birth is entirely dependent on how quickly ICPC clears them to leave the state. Travel and lodging can be a very expensive aspect of an interstate adoption. An experienced adoption attorney should be able to get clearance within 3 to 5 business days after the birth mother has signed her consent paperwork.
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