Infertility to Adoption - ArticlesAdoption or Surrogacy: How We Can Help With Both ProcessesIs Your Family Ready for Adoption?Coping with Infertility: 5 Steps to AcceptanceWill I Love an Adopted Child as Much as a Biological Child?When Only One Spouse Wants to AdoptWhat Are My Infertility Options?Adoption vs. IVF: What's Right for You?Choosing Adoption after InfertilityAdvantages of AdoptionWhat to Do When an Adoption Falls ThroughMore . . .
Hughes Law Center provides experienced, compassionate legal counsel and representation in adoption and Child Protective Services (CPS) defense cases. Attorney Kellye Hughes and legal assistant Julie Cobb are both adoptive parents as well as seasoned professionals in these areas of the law. The firm, based in the Arlington, Texas, area (with an address sometimes written as Pantego), serves as a...

In order to adopt the child, you must first terminate the parents’ rights (TPR) to the child. Although South Carolina has eleven grounds on which parental rights can be terminated, the most common are failure to visit and failure to support the child, each in excess of six months. The court must also decide if termination of parental rights is in the child’s best interests.

she has a 15 month old and knows she cant care for another. she wants to give me the baby as soon as it is born without going through courts or getting lawyers involved. can we do that if her and i write down the consent and the agreements, then have it noterized. i want to give her every opportunity to be close to her baby(open adoption) but i would be parent. i would be able to raise the baby, financially...
Here at the Law Offices of Karen Cushman, P.C., in Arlington, Texas, if it matters to your family, it matters to us. We promise to do all we can to help you resolve your matter efficiently and provide effective, customized solutions for your legal challenges involving family law, divorce and estate planning. Serving clients throughout the greater Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex and surrounding areas,...

The American Academy of Adoption Attorneys recently learned of the bankruptcy filing by the Independent Adoption Center (IAC) which is licensed in California, Florida, New York, Indiana, Connecticut, Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas. The announced permanent closing of all IAC offices and its programs nationwide has left many families in dire straits. Some may be in the middle of an adoption and are now left without supervision of the placement in order to complete and finalize the adoption, while others have paid substantial sums of money to participate in the IAC adoption program, which money will now likely be lost. This is a situation which should never happen.
You still have to find both parents (or make every attempt to locate them) in order to do TPR. Once TPR is completed by the court, then you can begin adoption process. If you can't locate the birthparent, you have to show valid attempts at really trying to locate them. A judge won't TPR because you said you can't find them. You have to SHOW PROOF that you really tried - for example, by contacting motor vehicles to get address, putting notices in newspapers, sending certified mail to all known addresses..etc. If a judge isn't 100% convinced that you did everything possible short of going door to door in the state, he will not TPR. He'll tell you to hire a private investigator to find the parents. There is no way to adopt a child without the birthparents finding out about it. You have to locate that birthmother & get her consent or prove that you went through great lengths to locate her. Once she is found, they will try to find out who the birthdad is-and then probably have you post a notice in the newspaper and check the putative father's registry to make sure he has been notified of the adoption. Once you have birthparents consent OR a judge agrees that you made a 100% effort to locate the birthparents & signs TPR, THEN you can file your paperwork to adopt. You can't do it without birthparents consent.
Helping people rebuild their financial reputations, we provide dedicated bankruptcy services at Davis, Ermis, & Roberts P.C. in Grand Prairie, Texas. Our law firm represents clients in the Grand Prairie and Arlington areas, as well as throughout North Texas, helping them get out from underneath their debts so they and their families can focus on moving forward. Our law firm understands the...

Common forms of adoption are domestic adoption, open adoption and closed adoption. Domestic adoptions are adoption by caretaker relatives and stepparents. A caretaker relative must be a person who is within the 5th degree of kinship to a child by blood or adoption. In adoption laws, to count a man as a child's father, he must be the legal father. A legal father is a man married to the child's mother when the child was conceived or born.

A child is not an asset like a house that gets willed to whoever you choose. In these situations, a court and/or child services will protect the child's rights and well being, if there are no legal guardians. If the child's mother has died, you are still one of the two legal guardians. If your mother becomes the second, that doesn't mean you stop being a legal guardian. If your mother then dies, you are still a legal guardian. The two slots do not have to be filled, one is enough. If you are stripped from your parental rights, your mother adopts, then dies, then the court will decide. If she wills that you again become a legal guardian, that does not undo the stripping of your rights.

Placing a Child for Adoption by Age - ArticlesPutting a Child Up for Adoption At Any AgeCan You Place a 1-Month-Old Up for Adoption? Can I Place My 2-Month-Old Up for Adoption?Can You Place a Child for Adoption at 3 Months? How to Place a 4-Month-Old Up for AdoptionHow to Place a 5-Month-Old for AdoptionCan I Place My 6-Month-Old Up for Adoption?Can I Place My Child for Adoption at 7 Months?Can I Place My 8-Month-Old Up for Adoption?Can I Place My Baby for Adoption at 9 Months Old?More . . .
For the past twenty years, I have been devoted to serving foster families in Indiana and helping foster children find permanent homes. I’ve handled cases in at least sixty of Indiana’s ninety-two counties…from Crown Point to Evansville to Fort Wayne. I am familiar with state and federal laws and Department of Child Services policies, and I know the people in the system.
Prepare for the bar. The bar exam is very intensive, and those taking it usually need to devote a large number of hours of study to preparing for the exam in order to increase their chances of passing it on the first attempt. Several companies offer exam prep courses that provide instruction about the subjects on the exam and provide sample questions and test-taking techniques.
An adoption attorney can help adopting parents understand their new rights and responsibilities to make the right decisions for the child. After one or both of a biological parents' rights have been terminated by court, an adoption can take place. In some cases, the assistance of an adoption lawyer is required by law. An adoption attorney will draft and review contracts while working with the adopting and biological parents as they navigate the adoption process of a child or a step-child.
Here at the Balekian Hayes, PLLC, law firm in Dallas, Texas, we are fully prepared to help you with all of your family law needs. Serving the rights and interests of clients throughout the greater Dallas metro region and surrounding areas, our law firm's attorneys, Kris Balekian Hayes and Justin Whiddon, each possess extensive legal knowledge and experience.   We promise to work closely...
As the nation’s largest constituent group of adoption attorneys, AAAA had a dramatic impact on proposed regulations published in 2015 governing the Indian Child Welfare Act. See  Academy Responds to New Indian Child Welfare Guidelines submitted to the BIA. In response, the BIA adopted a majority of the recommendations and concerns of Academy, for instance by affirming that voluntary adoption proceeding do not require notice to the tribes, and recognizing that parents have rights to make their own adoption plans for their children. The new regulations may be found on our ICWA page.   For detailed information please go to the Academy's webpage for ICWA in our section on Children's Rights.
A private adoption where the adoptive parents and the birth mother have not agreed beforehand can cost over $20,000. Before you make the financial and emotional investment in the adoption, you want an attorney who is familiar with all federal, state, and local laws and procedures. Depending on your location, expect to pay $100 to $200 per hour for skilled legal assistance.
The Academy of Adoption and Assisted Reproduction Attorneys (AAAA) is a credentialed organization dedicated to the competent and ethical practice of adoption and assisted reproduction law. It advocates for laws and policies to protect the best interests of children, the legal status of families formed through adoption and assisted reproduction, and the rights of all interested parties.
4. WHO IS FOLLOWING YOUR CASE? – Ask if you will be working with the attorney directly, or if a partner/associate or office staff member will be assigned to your case. What hours are they available? Do they prefer phone calls, emails, texts, etc.? It is important to know who is overseeing your adoption and, if other staff will be involved, who does what and when.

Prepare for the bar. The bar exam is very intensive, and those taking it usually need to devote a large number of hours of study to preparing for the exam in order to increase their chances of passing it on the first attempt. Several companies offer exam prep courses that provide instruction about the subjects on the exam and provide sample questions and test-taking techniques.


When you have spent months or years raising a child, you know something about their best interests, and it is important that you have your say before someone else takes these crucial decisions away from you. A child is to be removed from your home for reasons which are not in the child’s best interests. Foster care may have dragged on way past legal deadlines. Disagreements about the case plan itself that involve visitation, education, and other important matters may surface. You may need an advocate in court when your voice is not being heard on important issues. Foster parents who are appropriately assertive are more apt to be fully heard. To have an attorney to speak for you or to back you up often makes a big difference.


At Bailey & Galyen, we have been protecting the rights of individuals and families throughout Texas for years. We understand the intense emotions involved in the adoption process and are committed to providing a high level of person attention and service throughout the process. We work hard to be available whenever you need to talk with us, listening carefully to your questions and concerns. We will always keep you fully apprised of any developments in your case, as well as your options moving forward, so that we can minimize the stress and anxiety that comes with uncertainty.
The American Academy of Adoption Attorneys recently learned of the bankruptcy filing by the Independent Adoption Center (IAC) which is licensed in California, Florida, New York, Indiana, Connecticut, Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas. The announced permanent closing of all IAC offices and its programs nationwide has left many families in dire straits. Some may be in the middle of an adoption and are now left without supervision of the placement in order to complete and finalize the adoption, while others have paid substantial sums of money to participate in the IAC adoption program, which money will now likely be lost. This is a situation which should never happen.

If you wish to adopt you step-child (or children) there is no legal requirement that you be represented by an attorney. Nevertheless, it is a good idea to have an experienced adoption attorney by your side throughout the process to ensure that mistakes are avoided. If the child’s biological parent has not agreed to voluntarily relinquish his/her parental rights, the need for an attorney is heightened given that your ability to adopt your step-child hinges on your ability to convince a judge to terminate the biological parent’s rights.
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