Adoption law is a component of family law. If you become an adoption attorney, you'll provide representation to both birth and adoptive parents. You'll deal with litigation issues pertaining to parental consent, parental rights, and wrongful adoption as well as those relating to sexual orientation, race and culture, and international adoption. Your job may also involve helping clients set up trust accounts, providing guidance in seeking an adoptive or birth family, and ensuring that all legal aspects of an adoption are adhered to. 

Processing an adoption can be a scary prospect. For those who’ve never done it before, you don’t know what you don’t know. A lot is at stake and a lot can go wrong. Issues can crop up as new information comes to light. An experienced adoption attorney can anticipate and preclude these issues. A good adoption attorney will help preclude problems, issue spot risks and potential legal roadblocks, and manage the relationship with the biological family. An attorney is also able to help all parties find appropriate resources depending on their circumstances.
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The Worrell Law Firm is in top tier of adoption firms in the Dallas, Texas, area. We focus on providing comprehensive, individual, and affordable legal services to adoptive parents, adoption agencies, and birth parents in a professional and supportive environment. Focused on private adoptions in Dallas, TX, of all kinds, Best Adoption Attorney Dallas Same-sex adoptions Dallas TX Adoption attorney Adoption Agencies Dallas CPS Adoptions Dallas Agency adoptions dallas International Adoptions Dallas Inter-state Adoption Foster parent adoption Dallas Tx. Our practice is well respected in the field and in the community.
I was wondering if anyone has ever attempted to adopt a child without using a lawyer. I have a child, she is almost 16 years old and I've had custody of her since she was 5 1/2 months old. She is not a foster child, she was given to me by her birth mother because she couldn't care for her and she was young. She hasn't seen her birth mother or had any contact since she was 1 year. My husband and I want to adopt her and she wants that to. I need to know what steps to take to do this. The birth father is unknown. I'm not sure where to begin but think it might be with involuntary relinquishment of rights. Does anyone have any help? Thanks in advance.

The Hague Convention provides a specific process for international adoption that starts with a home study of the adoptive parents by a certified agency. The adoptive parents file Form I-800A with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service, which in turn sends its approval to the child’s home country. The authorities in that country match the application with a specific child and prepare a report. If the adoptive parents approve the match, they file Form I-800, which is provisionally approved and forwarded to the consular post of the State Department.
It is important to note that the information on this page, or on any page at RapidAdoption.com is provided under the agreement that you understand that neither they nor I are a law firm. Therefore, we do not give legal advice. The information shared is common knowledge in the adoption industry. If you need legal advice, consult an authorized legal professional.

In case of an open adoption, the identifying information of birth parents and adoptive parents are exchanged and there will be interaction between natural parents and the adopted person. However, this is subject to termination by the adoptive parent. Often natural parents and adoptive parents will enter into an agreement pertaining to rights concerning visitation, custody of child and other parental rights. Closed adoption, on the other hand, involves no exchange of personal information. In a closed adoption, the adoptive parent will be unaware of the family history of the adoptee.
We are closely following the California case (Lexi's Case) that has been receiving international attention and support reform to ICWA that may result in the public's knowledge of how ICWA is being used. Unfortunately, Lexi is not alone. These types of situations have been happening for years - probably most well known is the Baby Veronica case (Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl). There are many more - many more families who were scared to go to the media as their families and lives were devastated. These public cases are not anomalies. Lexi’s case shows clearly the tragedy that ensures when the child’s best interest is not the ultimate test of where a child should be placed. Lexi’s case is now before the United States Supreme Court on a petition for writ of certiorari, which the Academy supported by filing an amicus brief in support of the appellant former foster parents to Lexi, arguing the child’s best interests must be the paramount consideration in ICWA cases.

Here at the Balekian Hayes, PLLC, law firm in Dallas, Texas, we are fully prepared to help you with all of your family law needs. Serving the rights and interests of clients throughout the greater Dallas metro region and surrounding areas, our law firm's attorneys, Kris Balekian Hayes and Justin Whiddon, each possess extensive legal knowledge and experience.   We promise to work closely...
They may not provide matching services. You may need to work with another adoption professional, such as an adoption agency, to be matched with a waiting adoptive family. Alternatively, you may need to independently identify an adoptive family that you would like to pursue an adoption plan with. This can potentially limit the number of families you have to choose from. In addition, there are other services your attorney may not be able to provide throughout the adoption process, such as counseling and support. If adoption counseling is offered, it is normally through an unlicensed paralegal with little adoption counseling experience. The attorney also will not usually be able to keep up with post-adoption agreements, such as receiving pictures and letters, whereas adoption agencies often have programs in place to coordinate these services.
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